Cow mandible with honeycomb network of abcesses from actinomycosis infection. Actinomyces bovis is a gram-positive bacteria that leads to granulomatous abcessing of infected areas of the head and neck in cattle which can destroy bone. A rel…ated bacterium A. israelii causes a simillar but more rare condition in humans. In cattle the condition is referred to as “lumpy jaw.” Untreated, the infection will produce copious amounts of pus whichs discharges from the skin. Actinomyces were one thought to be a fungus because of their branching filamentous structures.
Cow mandible with honeycomb network of abcesses from actinomycosis infection. Actinomyces bovis is a gram-positive bacteria that leads to granulomatous abcessing of infected areas of the head and neck in cattle which can destroy bone. A related bacterium A. israelii causes a simillar but more rare condition in humans. In cattle the condition is referred to as “lumpy jaw.” Untreated, the infection will produce copious amounts of pus whichs discharges from the skin. Actinomyces were one thought to be a fungus because of their branching filamentous structures.
Reblogging my most popular post to let everyone know that Osteocentric has moved to Facebook. Please like the Osteocentric page to see more images and news on human osteology, Paleopathology, physical and forensic anthropology. Most but not all are original images from my medical museum work. https://www.facebook.com/Osteocentric

Reblogging my most popular post to let everyone know that Osteocentric has moved to Facebook. Please like the Osteocentric page to see more images and news on human osteology, Paleopathology, physical and forensic anthropology. Most but not all are original images from my medical museum work. https://www.facebook.com/Osteocentric

(Source: osteocentric)

Gustave Tramond produced Natural History Specimens and Anatomical Models primarily in wax, but also prepared human skeletons in Paris at 9 rue de l’Ecole de Medicine in the same shop owned and run by his father-in-law Pierre N. Vasseur.

Gustave Tramond produced Natural History Specimens and Anatomical Models primarily in wax, but also prepared human skeletons in Paris at 9 rue de l’Ecole de Medicine in the same shop owned and run by his father-in-law Pierre N. Vasseur.

Three osteology supplier adds from the Medical Times and Gazette Sept 21 Vol 2 1861.

Three osteology supplier adds from the Medical Times and Gazette Sept 21 Vol 2 1861.

Prices of skeletons prepared by Louis Auzoux of Paris as sold by George Dexter of Albany, New York. 1844.

Prices of skeletons prepared by Louis Auzoux of Paris as sold by George Dexter of Albany, New York. 1844.

As far as I know Clay Adams was the only company to resort to using ink stamps instead of labels on their specimens.

As far as I know Clay Adams was the only company to resort to using ink stamps instead of labels on their specimens.

Berendsohn Brothers New York 1875

Berendsohn Brothers New York 1875

History of Skeletons for Medical Study

A short explanation on the theme of recent posts. I am researching the history of osteological preparations for medical study, possibly for a future publication. It was the requirement for first year medical students to have their own skeleton that drove the human skeleton industry now dominated by plastics. The industry flourished particularly in Paris in 19th century and India in the 20th with several smaller sources in New York, London and Berlin. Local practices around medical colleges also produced skeletons for study after the passage of a state or local Anatomy Act. Such an Act supplied anatomy departments and museums with unclaimed bodies from almshouses, hospitals and police morgues. The Anatomy Act made the practice perfectly legal whereas the previous source of remains was grave robbery. If no grave is disturbed then only the local health codes and moral indignation would affect dissection and body disposition. After dissection the bodies could be skeletonized by the more eager students. Morgue janitors even reportedly used the opportunity to make extra money by preparing skeletons to sell to students and professors. Entrepreneurs would also set up small shops on the outskirts of the cities where these skeletons could be processed. The accompanying odors often lead to a visit by a local reporter who would produce a sensationalized account of what they saw in the newspaper.

From Guy’s Hospital Gazette, September 1905. Instructions for 1st year medical students on obtaining skeletal specimens for study. I wonder if the author was making an attempt at humor when referring to it as a “dry subject.”

From Guy’s Hospital Gazette, September 1905. Instructions for 1st year medical students on obtaining skeletal specimens for study. I wonder if the author was making an attempt at humor when referring to it as a “dry subject.”